Kick the Soda Pop Habit – A Pitcher of Water with Lemon is One Way

Want to stop drinking pop?

By Karen Caffarini
GateHouse News Service

For die-hard soda lovers, it’s a combination of the sweet taste, carbonation that tickles the taste buds and caffeine (for cola fans) that makes the soft drinks so addicting.But doctors and registered dieticians say this is one habit that should be kicked as quickly as possible, both for health and weight reasons.

“How quickly to change? As quickly as you can, taking care not to cause a bad caffeine withdrawal,” recommends Dr. Dana S. Simpler, an internist with 25 years’ experience in primary care in Baltimore.

Experts admit it could be difficult to wean yourself off soda, but say there are plenty of substitutes that will quench your thirst and satisfy all three sensations. Some suggestions:

Replace soft drinks with healthy beverages such as unsweetened iced tea or coffee, or water, says Dr. Kira Schmid, who recommends going cold turkey. Schmid is staff doctor and associate director of scientific affairs with Life Extension in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Because it can be difficult to avoid overindulging on soft drinks when dining out, especially if free refills are offered, Schmid suggests ordering unsweetened iced tea or water instead.

Simpler strongly encourages her patients to just drink just water. “They can add a little bit of juice to it — maybe 1/4 cup juice to 3/4 cup water — if they really need some flavor,” Simpler says. Or, she says, cut up an orange or lemon and leave it in a pitcher of water in the refrigerator all day. The water will get some of the fruit flavor.

If you need the carbonation, try carbonated water, suggests Angela Douge, a registered dietician with Dominican University’s Nutrition Sciences Department in River Forest, Ill. She says you can dress it up with some lime or lemon juice.

Unsweetened ice tea with a level teaspoon of sugar is OK as long as you don’t drink it within six hours of trying to fall asleep, Simpler says. She recommends skipping the bottled ice teas, which she says are generally packed with sugar.

If you can’t go cold turkey, Douge suggests grabbing a glass of soda with ice when you want a treat, not when you’re thirsty: “Drink water when you’re thirsty. If you want a soda, sip and enjoy it, put it on ice and be done with it. Only do it, though, when you’re craving it.

Read more:  North Attleboro, MA – North Attleborough Free Press

Thirsty? Drink water, but not necessarily 8 glasses a day

Eight glasses of water a day? No, says expert

By Martin Johnston | nzherald.co.nz

Doggedly following advice to drink at least eight glasses of water a day is said to be of no health benefit to most people and only enriches bottling companies.

And it makes people go to the toilet a lot.

Public health researcher Rob Quigley said yesterday adults typically needed around 2 litres of fluids a day, but did not need to obtain all of this by drinking water.

“We get a lot of fluid from food. Fruit and vegetables are upwards of 90-95 per cent water. Eating an apple a day is a little bit like drinking a glass of water.”

Australian university lecturer Spero Tsindos, who examines water consumption in the latest edition of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, said encouraging people to drink large amounts of water was driven by vested interests.

Pricier brands of bottled water can cost more than $3 a litre at New Zealand supermarkets.

A Pennsylvania University research review published in 2008 found no evidence that drinking eight glasses of water a day improved skin tone, aided dieting or prevented headaches (except those induced by hangovers).

A person’s daily fluid needs, in addition to the quantities derived from food and plain water, can be supplied from tea, coffee and even moderate amounts of mildly alcoholic drinks such as beer – despite their mildly diuretic effects – and various other drinks.

“Out of all the fluids to drink,” Mr Quigley said, “water is one of the best, Read more…

City Council Considers Eliminating Fluoride from Drinking Water

by Dan Kleiner | The Madisonville Meteor

Corrosion discovered at one of the City of Madisonville’s water wells sparked a discussion about fluoride levels in the City’s drinking water at a recent City Council meeting.

City Council at its regular meeting May 14 discussed the possibility of ceasing to add the chemical to the City’s supply altogether or reducing the amount injected into the system.

Currently, the City injects enough fluoride into its drinking water to bring the level to between 0.7 and 0.8 parts per million, a level recommended by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Council members and city staff questioned the impact that injecting fluoride into the City’s water system has and will continue to research the issue and prepare a recommendation for a later meeting.

“If we’re going to continue to lower (fluoride levels in the water), it might just be best to take it out of the system altogether,” Public Works Director Kevin Story said.

City staff discovered corrosion at Water Well No. 5 approximately one month ago and upon contacting an engineer received the recommendation that they reduce the level of fluoride being injected into the water supply. Read more…

Top 10 Hydration Tips for Running

Any experienced runner can educate you on why it is important to stay properly hydrated before you run, while you run and after you have finished a run. A healthy fluid intake helps runners to avoid suffering dehydration and heat exhaustion. It also limits the chance of developing muscle cramps or other similar injuries and promotes optimal performance.

There is much more involved in staying hydrated while running than simply drinking lots of water. Proper hydration begins before you lace up your running shoes and continues after you kick them off. Failing to maintain fluid levels is foolish and dangerous.

Consider these 10 hydration tips to enhance your runs:

Calculate sweat rate: Everyone has different fluid needs. Calculate your sweat rate to determine how much fluid you need during a run.  Read more…